Hospital Bag Checklists

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Shop our Categories:

Why Shop Curasanas?

* Best Product Design:

  • Functional, user-friendly
  • Clinically supportive
  • Comfortable, uplifting and distinctly appealing
Experience why our wearable get-well wishes offer the best recovery wear solution around. >
 
Curasanas: Wear. Care. Share.

Newsletter

Hospital Bag Checklists

This article lays out suggestions of what one may want to consider packing in a hospital bag ready for whatever your circumstances may be.

Please note that below are simply suggestions of items that people have found useful to have. Know thyself and what will make you comfortable. Admittedly, the list is exhaustive, as we have scoured for ideas so you don’t have to wonder whether you’ve considered everything. You can file this under disclaimer: you should probably leave at home anything you really like and would be upset if they got lost or ruined. That said, I don’t know if that keeps many from bringing their ipads, lucky rabbits foot, etc. etc

Bear in mind that you may also amass some items (flowers/gifts, hospital supplies) and, in addition to those, what you bring in, you must bring out! At the end of the day, this isn’t Armageddon and you won’t be in Siberia, either; you can always send someone for any extra supplies. Don’t sweat it! The packed hospital bag is to bring one peace of mind, not stress.

THE LIST:

The only real minimum requirements are ID, Insurance info, any hospital forms you may have been given and, if you are having a baby, a change of clothes and an approved car seat to bring him/her home (have this already installed in your car weeks prior particularly if you are a newby).

356_child female tunic_wbagIt would be remiss not to start with a shameless plug for Curasanas hospital gowns!   A cozy and useful convenience to make you more comfortable and better equipped through recovery from hospital to home. Feel more covered and civilized when you receive guests or walk the corridors as so many are required before discharge (but without flashing the world while you’re at it!). Nursing mothers will also delight in the easy and modest accessibility for breastfeeding (no snaps, just pat shut after exposing only what baby needs). As most patients complete the bulk of their recovery at home, you can appreciate the functionality Curasanas offers that your regular clothes cannot and, even long thereafter, enjoy your Curasanas as comfy pjs once you’re all better. For folks diagnosed with chronic conditions that may mean repeat hospital stays, it can be comforting to know you’ll have Curasanas always on hand to make your journey a little more tolerable.

Note: If you have a tour or pre-op meeting, you might ask your hospital what they provide, and take those items off your list.
 This is also an excellent time to ask about policies around any medication you regularly take (a note from your doctor may be required) and any over-the-counter medication you may want to bring (e.g. stool softener, pain reliever). Evidently, this can be problematic in some hospitals so good to ask in advance, if possible, or talk with your doctor.

We’ve asterisked below those suggestions particular to Labor & Delivery patients.

    • Have your bags (one for you, one for baby) packed and in your car or front closet by your 35th week of pregnancy (earlier never hurt anyone).
    • As mentioned above, insurance info, your personal identification, hospital forms if provided in advance
    • Birth plan (if you have one) 
and an open mind that things can change, it’ll be okay!
    • 2-3 pairs of warm socks. Non-skid socks, slippers, and/or flipflops are a smart idea (most stays require walks before discharge and of course one doesn’t want to slip! Flip flops offer added benefit for use in showers)
    • A warm robe or cardigan sweater as hospitals are often drafty
    • A couple maternity bras and/or nursing tank tops — no underwire — and nursing pads (whether or not you plan to nurse, you’ll appreciate the support and leak-protection). If you have a c-section, you may be in the hospital long enough to be engorged so you might be prepared with a bigger size bra.
    • Lansinoh or other lanolin cream which can be so handy for sore nipples
    • Lip balm, hand lotion (hospitals can be particularly dry)
    • Toiletries and personal items — brush, toothbrush, toothpaste, deodorant, face wash, makeup, shampoo, conditioner, lotion, contact lens case and solution (travel-sizes are smart). Hairdryer. Soft headband or ponytail holders. Note: Hospitals will have many of these available but, like when traveling, many prefer to have one’s own things
    • Eyeglasses
    • Pen and paper
 (for notes/instructions and keeping track of any questions that can come up for
      medical staff)
    • Cash/change for parking/vending machines/incidentals (some even pack protein bars/drinks for emergency in case they’re in the hospital after regular cafeteria hours).
    • Cell phone and charger, phone numbers of people to call after birth, prepaid calling card (if your hospital doesn’t allow cell phones), laptop/ipad or dvd player 
(you might appreciate the distraction with a long labor! And these can also be handy for maintaining communication with the outside world as needed)
    • A few pairs of maternity underwear or high-waisted ‘granny panties’ that can get ruined (hospitals give disposable pairs, which some women find handy but others find gross), heavy flow sanitary pads (again, the hospital supplies these things, but you may bring your own if you’re picky). Some women even swear by bringing Depends for use in the first 24 – 36 hours after birth. Others advise having Tucks on hand, that hospitals don’t always provide.
    • Cord-blood banking kit (if using)
    • If you’re working and taking maternity leave, you may have some paperwork your company requires that you may want to take with you. For instance, some leave-related paperwork can require a confirmation of delivery within 5 days, so if you have it with you, you can directly deal with your doctor completing it and sending it in.
    • Sugar-free hard candy or lozenges to keep your mouth moist during labor (candy with sugar can make you thirsty). Some say the scent of Peppermint is most universally effective in decreasing nausea, also handy in labor.
    • Camera, film or extra memory card, battery or charger
    • For your partner/loved one accompanying you, a gym bag packed with a change of clothes and critical items
    • Extra pillow (with a case that can get ruined and distinctive from plain hospital white). Hospital pillows often have a vinyl/plastic cover some find annoying. Note: You might want to check with your hospital about bringing a pillow. Due to outbreaks of bed bugs, evidently some hospitals won’t allow people to bring any bedding from home.
    • Comfortable change of clothes for going home (for patients delivering babies, you’ll want these to be particularly roomy, in at least a 6-month maternity size (you might err on the bigger side) and flat shoes
    • A good bath towel (the ones at hospitals are often tiny, thin, rough, sad things)
    • Breast pump, if you plan to use one or if you’re not an old pro. Some hospitals provide them. You might check in advance. Some people like bringing their own to use while they have the benefit of the lactation consultants with whom to practice.
    • Mindless distractions: Very light reading, knitting, puzzle books, ipad/laptop/portable dvd player with new/favorite movies/apps (most hospitals have wifi too), music player loaded with your favorite tunes, maybe some varied types of playlists. Many may be deluding oneself in thinking you will be able to get a lot of work done and if you are an effective multi-tasker/road warrior go nuts, but you might also pack some light reading if you need to be occupied but can’t quite manage a spreadsheet or memo under medication.
    • If packing for a kid, make sure to grab a mix of items to occupy them: coloring/activity books, cards, can be great before breaking out video games. Favorite things from home can be so comforting.
    • Other items that some find helpful during labor: massage oil, tennis ball in a sock, lucky/ inspirational objects. One even suggested flameless votive candles or some other soft light as an alternative to the often harsh hospital lights for a more “relaxing” labor (ha) or night nursing.
    • Extra bags for dirty linens for carrying out gifts or supplies you are given during your stay (reusable grocery bags can be handy).
    • Eyeshades and ear plugs. Hospitals can be busy places and you need solid good rest when you can get it! Even if you think you are a heavy sleeper, bring them. You’ll thank me.

* For those delivering babies, you may also pack for him/her:



  • A coming-home outfit
  • For the ride home, warm blanket, extra hat, outdoor gear if seasonally appropriate (babies are extra sensitive to cold)
  • Any extra items or special clothing/blankie/hat etc that you might want used in early pictures (now many hospitals offer newborn photos so coming prepared could be worthwhile; it can be surprising the studio-worthy shots these days and often you can even use them for birth announcements. Don’t fret, often less is more in pictures during these early days, we just mention it in case you really wanted to show off the hand-knit cap from your Aunt Edna.
  • Mittens and/or nail clippers if you don’t prefer to file or nibble baby nails off yourself. If you plan on nursing, you may bring a boppy pillow or equivalent
  • An approved car seat to bring him/her home (have this already installed in your car weeks prior, particularly if you are a newby).

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